Are Humans Ready For Gravity? A global question.

I can point you guys in the right direction but I want to ask you first what Gravity means and what it will do to this planet. What you seek changes every aspect of life. This doesn't just give you a flying car. What gravity does in space is something you might not be ready for. Once you learn how gravity works it explains the ever expansion we see and can't explain by the big bang, you lose the Biggs boson because you also find out where gravity is being birthed. Another issue that arrives is once you find out what it takes to make gravity you discover there are already devices in existence that are banned by your planet. In a perfect world this would be great but what we don't live there. Shutting down ever coal, oil, and gas factory in the world is not that great of a thing. We're talking hundreds of thousands of lives being sacrificed if you do this wrong. Sending the world back to the dark ages basically because of a colapse in the social and economic structure. You ever wonder for a species that's as old as our with evidence of the past having tech we desire why we don't have this stuff today?

Comments

  • Another issue that arrives is once you find out what it takes to make gravity you discover there are already devices in existence that are banned by your planet.
    This is an interesting one. What devices are banned on our planet?
  • @Zeus Welcome to Magnetic Universe! :)
    Is there really something called "gravity"? IMHO if the solar/planetary systems work the way they say, the gravity must be working as a rubber band.
    The further a planet gets from it's sun, the more tension there is in such "rubber band" between that planet and the sun and this would then cause the planet to come back and revolve around the sun. Isn't it like that?
    They say, gravity is of magnetic nature, but how could that be? We all know that magnetic attraction loses the force with the distance significantly. Should't it be that as a planet gets further away from sun, the gravitational force is weaker and weaker and the planet would escape the system?
  • I'm a fan of Jean de Climont's (link below) model of gravity though it is not thorough enough (many questions arise).

    J
  • Zeus said:

    Another issue that arrives is once you find out what it takes to make gravity you discover there are already devices in existence that are banned by your planet.

    ssd510, maybe you're looking at it wrong. Presuming you are as human as me, and I'm pretty sure I'm 100% human, I think... He said 'your' planet. Perhaps he is as human as us, and talking to the alien visitors. And not alien talking to us about our planet.
    Unless I'm looking at it wrong, and you're an alien asking what's banned on your planet... Then I presume you and him have some better knowledge of said planet than I do. And it's apparently complex and bureaucratic technology laws. Which is possible, I'm fairly smart, but not exactly what you would call, 'experienced in cultural diversity.'

  • I prefer to keep this grounded. Talking about aliens only detracts from the point; what is gravity? If you have ideas I'm all ears.
  • edited November 2016
    Gravity is light. Err, light is gravity. Err, gravity is a byproduct of the electromagnetic nature of light I mean.
    On a less serious note, aliens because the entire first paragraph smacks of bad grammar, a twinge of paranoia, and what reads like a bad youtube video from one of Alex Jones' so called 'field experts.' I despise that man...
    For example, quoted; "We're talking hundreds of thousands of lives being sacrificed if you do this wrong." That's a bold statement, with absolutely no logical proof to back it up, and even worse, who is making the claims? It's fallacy.
    I prefer not to dignify this type of illogical and mildly ignorant thinking with a dignified response.
    But since you asked for one, I would say light is gravity, err what I said above.
    In the beginning, light. Ed ends with light in MC for a reason. Because it all begins with light, and ed's M.O. is to mirror and reverse things.
  • edited November 2016
    Gravity(the aether) as @Jehovajah has always pointed out....it exist at the tiniest level and the grandest
  • jrc58 said:

    Gravity(the aether) as @Jehovajah has always pointed out....it exist at the tiniest level and the grandest

    and the grandest... ? :) Is there something missing?

  • I am sorry @jrc58 , I chose not to discuss gravity in this thread . If you would like to start a thread to explore the word and concept of gravity I would contribute at that time.
  • edited November 2016
    http://etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=gravity
    gravity (n.)
    c. 1500, "weight, dignity, seriousness, solemnity of deportment or character, importance," from Old French gravité "seriousness, thoughtfulness" (13c.) and directly from Latin gravitatem (nominative gravitas) "weight, heaviness, pressure," from gravis "heavy" (see grave (adj.)). The scientific sense of "downward acceleration of terrestrial bodies due to gravitation of the Earth" first recorded 1620s.
    The words gravity and gravitation have been more or less confounded; but the most careful writers use gravitation for the attracting force, and gravity for the terrestrial phenomenon of weight or downward acceleration which has for its two components the gravitation and the centrifugal force. [Century Dictionary, 1902]

    gravitation (n.)
    1640s in physics, "force that gives weight to objects," also figurative, "act of tending toward a center of attraction," from Modern Latin gravitare (see gravitate). Compare gravity.

    levity (n.)
    1560s, "want of seriousness, frivolity," from French levite, from Latin levitatem (nominative levitas) "lightness," literal and figurative; "light-mindedness, frivolity," from levis "light" in weight, from PIE root *legwh- "lightness" (see lever). In old science (16c.-17c.), the name of a force or property of physical bodies, the opposite of gravity, causing them to tend to rise.

    levitate (v.)
    1670s, "to rise by virtue of lightness" (intransitive), from Latin levitas "lightness," on the model of gravitate (compare levity). Transitive sense of "raise (a person) into the air, cause to become buoyant" (1870s) is mainly from spiritualism. Related: Levitated; levitating.
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